Colloquia

Colloqiua, Cognitive Psychology and LIBC

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The neuropsychology of perception and action

 

Date and time: 18 October 2017, 1pm
Location: Faculty of Social Sciences, Pieter de la Court gebouw, Wassenaarseweg 52, SA41

The visual brain of primates and humans consists of two systems. These two systems are anatomically distinct and operate functionally in largely independent ways. One, the ventral system, creates a visual representation of the external world, the other, the dorsal system, uses visual information to guide our actions. In support of this model findings from anatomy, physiology, and psychophysics were presented. However the most compelling evidence for this hypothesis comes from the field of Neuropsychology. Milner and Goodale, who introduced the dual-systems hypothesis, regarded the contrasting deficits of patients with visual form agnosia and optic ataxia as the most compelling piece of evidence for their model. Patients with visual form agnosia and patients with unilateral neglect produce near-normal visuomotor behavior despite profound perceptual deficits. Patients with optic ataxia show the opposite behavioral pattern. Milner and Goodale argued that it is hard to explain this double-dissociation unless you assume some form of neuroanatomical division of labor between perception and action. In this talk I wish to present findings from visual form agnosia, unilateral neglect and optic ataxia in an effort to show that it might not be that difficult to account for the neuropsychology of perception and action without adopting the dual-systems hypothesis.  

 

Date and time: 1 November 2017, 1pm
Location: Faculty of Social Sciences, Pieter de la Court gebouw, Wassenaarseweg 52, SB11

Is it possible to perceive others’ intentions? Are intentions visible in others’ behaviour? Previous studies investigating intention detection relied almost exclusively on indirect evidence of intention-related information in movement kinematics; none measured this information, resulting potentially in a set of ‘pitfalls’. The strategy we propose to overcome these pitfalls and quantify the observability of intentions combines rigorous kinematic and quantitative behavioural techniques with modelling and classification analysis.  First, we record the kinematics of movements performed with different intents, and use statistics and machine learning techniques as a means to quantify the intention-related information available in movement kinematics. Next, using videos of the same movements, we measure and manipulate the usefulness of this information for the detection of mental states, i.e., its perceptual efficiency. Finally, by combining modelling techniques such as classification and regression trees with neuroimaging techniques we investigate the neural mechanisms underlying the ability to read others’ intentions. This strategy, we propose, may be applied not only to intentions, but also to any mental state instantiated into a specific pattern of behaviour, including emotions, motives, and even desires.
 

 

Date and time: 22 November 2017, 1pm
Location: Faculty of Social Sciences, Pieter de la Court gebouw, Wassenaarseweg 52, room SB11

 

 

Date and time: 13 December 2017,  1pm
Location: Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, Pieter de la Court gebouw, Wassenaarseweg 52, room SA41

 

 

Date and time: 24 January 2018,  1pm
Location: Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, Pieter de la Court gebouw, Wassenaarseweg 52, room to be announced

 

 

Date and time: 7 February, 2018, 1pm
Location: Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, Pieter de la Court gebouw, Wassenaarseweg 52, room to be announced

 

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